Part I : Navigation
Part II : Canal Lakes (Charactaristics)
Part III : Communications - Signals
Part IV : Tonnage And Dues
CH XII: Computation of Tonnage
CH XIII: Transit and Towage Dues
CH XIV: Payment of Canal  Dues
Part V : Vessels Carrying Dangerous Cargo
Appendices

CH XII: Computation of Tonnage
 

Art. 93 – Extract from the Regulations for the Measurement of tonnage
recommended by the International Tonnage Commission assembled at Constantinople, In 1873.

( Minutes of proceedings XXI, Appendix II ).

General Principles :

  1. The gross tonnage or total capacity of ships comprises the exact measurement of all spaces ( without any exception ),
    below the upper deck, as well as of all permanently covered and closed - in spaces on that deck.
    N.B. : By permanently covered and closed - in spaces on the upper deck are to be understood all those spaces which are separated off by decks or coverings, or fixed partitions and therefore represent an increase of capacity which might be used for the stowage of merchandise, or for the berthing and accommodation of the passengers or of the officers and crew.
    Thus, any one or more openings, either in the deck or coverings, or in the partition, or a break in the deck, or the absence of a portion of the partition, will not prevent such spaces being comprised in the gross tonnage, if they can be easily closed - in after admeasurement, and thus better fitted for the transport of goods and passengers.
    But the spaces under awning decks without other connection with the body of the ship than the props necessary for supporting them, which are not spaces
    “ separated off ” and are permanently exposed to the weather and the sea, will not be comprised in the gross tonnage, although they may serve to shelter the ship’s crew, the deck passengers and even merchandise known as “ deck loads ”.
  2. “ Deck loads ” are not comprised in the measurement.
  3. Closed spaces for the use or possible use of passengers will not be deducted from the gross tonnage.
  4. The determination of deduction for coal spaces may be effected either by the rules of the European Danube Commission of 1871 or by the exact measurement of fixed bunkers.

Rule 1 – For Empty Vessels

( Art. 1  ) The length for the admeasurement of ships having one or more decks is taken on the tonnage deck, which is :

  1.  The upper deck for vessels having one or two decks.
  2. The second deck from below for vessels having more than two decks.
    Measure the length of the ship in a straight line along the upper side of the tonnage deck from the inside of the inner plank ( average thickness ) at the side of the stem to the inside of the midship stern timber or plank there, as the case may be ( average thickness ), deducting from this length what is due to the rake of the bow in the thickness of deck, and what is due to the rake of the stern timber in the thickness of the deck, and also what is due to the rake of the stern timber in one-third of the round of the beam; divide the length so taken into the number of equal parts required by the following Table (1), according to the class in such Table to which the ship belongs.

( Art. 2  )

  1.  Class 1 :  Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, 50 feet long or under, into four equal parts.
  2. Class 2 :  Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, above 50 feet long and not exceeding 120 feet, into six equal parts.
  3. Class 3 :  Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, above 120 feet long and not exceeding 180 feet, into eight equal parts.
  4. Class 4 :  Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, above 180 feet long and not exceeding 225 feet, into ten equal parts.
  5. Class 5 :  Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, above 225 feet long, into twelve equal parts.(1)

( Art. 3  ) 

Then, the hold being first sufficiently cleared to admit of the required depths and breadths being properly taken, find the transverse area of such ship to each point of division of the length as follows :
Measure the depth at each point of division, from a point at a distance of one-third of the round of the beam below such deck, or, in case of a break, below a line stretched in continuation thereof, to the upper side of the floor timber, at the inside of the limber strake, after deducting the average thickness of the ceiling which is between the bilge planks and the limber strake.  
Then, if the depth at the midship division of the length does not exceed 16 feet, divide each depth into four equal parts; then measure the inside horizontal breadth at each of the three points of division, and also at the upper and lower points of the depth, extending each measurement to the average thickness of that part of the ceiling which is between the points of measurement. Number these breadths from above
( ie numbering the upper breadth 1, and so on down to the lowest breadth ).
Multiply the second and fourth by four, and third by two; add these products together, and to the sum add the first breadth and the fifth.  Multiply the quantity thus obtained by one-third of the common interval between the breadths, and the product shall be deemed the transverse area; but if the midship depth exceed 16 feet, divide each depth into six equal parts instead of four, and measure, as before directed, the horizontal breadths at the five points of division, and also at the upper   and lower points of the depth, number them from above, as before,multiply the second, fourth, and sixth by four, and the third and fifth by two; add these products together, and to the sum add the first breadth and seventh.  Multiply the quantity thus obtained by one-third of the common interval between the breadths, and the product shall be deemed the transverse area.

( Art. 4 ) 

The area of the transverse sections can also be measured with the same precision by the following method of polar co-ordinates :
Divide each transverse half-section into five angular sectors, having the same angle at the apex
( this angle is equal to 90 of a degree = 18 degrees ), and take for the area of each of these sectors the area of the sector of the circle comprised between its extreme radii, and described by the mean radius. In making the measurement, measure the mean radius of each sector, of which the two extreme radii would make, the one with the horizontal line and the other with the vertical line, an angle of 9 degrees, while the others are uniformly 18 degrees apart.  In order to obtain their directions, place on the plane of the section a semi-circle properly divided, and turned so that its horizontal diameter may pass through the third of the round of the beam, and that its centre may be found in the central longitudinal vertical plane of the ship; the radii are to be measured by means of a tape fixed in the centre of the semi-circle. In order to calculate the area of the section, square the mean radii thus measured, add them together, and the sum multiplied by 3.1416 shall be deemed to the area of the section.

 

( Art. 5 )

Number the transverse sections measured by one of these methods successively 1, 2, 3, etc giving No 1 to the extreme limit of the length at the bow, and the last number to the extreme limit of the length at the stern; then, whether the length be divided according to the table into four or twelve parts, as in Classes 1 and 5, or any intermediate number, as in Classes 2, 3 and 4, multiply the second and every even-numbered area by four and the third and every odd-numbered area ( except the first and last ) by two; add these products together, and to the sum add the first and last, if they yield anything; multiply the quantity thus obtained by one-third of the common interval between the areas, and the product will be the cubical contents of the space under the tonnage deck.  The tonnage of this volume is obtained by dividing it by 100, if the measurements are taken in english feet, and by 2.83 if the measurements are taken in metres. (1)

( Art. 6 ) 

If the ship has a third deck, commonly called a spar deck, the tonnage of the space between it and the tonnage deck shall be ascertained as follows : Measure in feet the inside length of the space at the middle of its height from the plank at the side of the stem to the lining on the timbers at the stern, and divide the length into the same number of equal parts into which the length of the tonnage deck is divided, as above directed; measure ( also at the middle of its height ) the inside breadth of its space at each of the points of division, also the breadth at the stem and the breadth at the stern; number them successively 1, 2, 3 etc commencing at the stem, multiply the second and all the other even-numbered breadths by four, and the third and all the other odd-numbered breadths ( except the first and last ) by two; to the sum of these products add the first and last breadths, multiply the whole sum of one-third of the common interval between the breadths, and the result will give in superficial feet the mean horizontal area of such space; measure the mean height of such space, and multuply by it the mean horizontal area, and the product will be the cubical contents of space; divide this product by 100, or by 2.83 if the measurements are taken in metres, and the quotient shall be deemed to be the tonnage of such space, and shall be added to the other tonnage of the ship ascertained as aforesaid; and if the ship has more than three decks, the tonnage of each space between decks above the tonnage deck shall be severally ascertained in manner above described, and shall be added to the tonnage of the ship ascertained as aforesaid.

( Art. 7 ) 

If there be a break, a poop, or any other permanent closed-in space on the upper deck, available for cargo or stores, or for the berthing or accommodation of passengers of crew, the tonnage of such space shall be ascertained as follows : Measure the internal mean length of such space in feet, and divide it into two equal parts; measure at the middle of its height three inside breadths, namely, one at each end and the other at the middle of the length; then to the sum of the end breadths add four times the middle breadth, and multiply the whole sum by one-third of the common interval between the breadths; the product will give the mean horizontal area of such space; then measure the mean height, and multiply by it the mean horizontal area; divide the product by 100, or by 2.83 if the measurements are taken in metres, in order to obtain the tonnage of such space.

( Art. 8 )

In measuring the length, breadth, and height of the general volume of the ship or that of the other spaces, reduce to the mean thickness the parts of the ceiling which exceed it.
When the ceiling is wanting, or when it is not permanently fixed, the length and breadth are reckoned from the frame of the ship.

Rule 2 – For Laden Ships

( Art. 9 ) 

When ships have their cargo on board, or when for any other reason their tonnage cannot be ascertained by means of Rule 1, proceed in the following manner : 
Measure the length on the upper deck from the outside of the outer plank at the stem to the aftside of the stern-post, deducting there from the distance between the aftside of the stern-post and the rabbet of the stern-post at the point where the counter-plank crosses it.
Measure also the greatest breadth of the ship to the outside of the outer planking or wales.
Then, having first marked on the outside of the ship, on both sides thereof, the height of the upper deck at the ship’s sides, girth the ship at the greatest breadth in a direction perpendicular to the keel from the height so marked on the outside of the ship, on the one side, to the height so marked on the other side by passing a chain under the keel; to half the girth thus taken add half the main  breadth; square the sum, multiply the result by the length of the ship taken as aforesaid; then multiply this product by the factor 0.17 ( seventeen hundredths )in the case of ships built of wood, and by the factor 0.18 ( eighteen hundredths ) in the case of ships built of iron.
The product will give approximately the cubical contents of the ship, and the general tonnage can be ascertained by dividing by 100 or by 2.83, according to the measurements taken in English feet or in meters.

( Art. 10 ) 

If there is a break, a poop, or other permanent covered and closed - in spaces ( as defined in the general principles ) on the upper deck, the tonnage of such spaces shall be ascertained by multiplying together the mean length, breadth and depth of such spaces and dividing the product by 100 or 2.83, according to the measurements taken in English feet or meters, and the quotient so obtained shall be deemed to be the tonnage of such space, and shall be added to the other tonnage in order to determine the gross tonnage or total capacity of the ship.
Deductions :(1) 
To be made from the Gross Tonnage in order to ascertain the Net Tonnage :

( Art. 11 ) 

To find from the gross tonnage of vessels as above set forth the official,
or net registered tonnage, either for sailing vessels or for steam ships, the following mode
of operations must be resorted to

Sailing Vessels 

( Art. 12 )

For sailing vessels deduct : the spaces exclusively and entirely occupied by the crew and ship’s officers, those taken up by the cookhouse and latrines exclusively used by the ship’s officers and crew whether they be situated above or below the upper deck; the covered and closed in spaces, if there be any situated on the upper deck, and used for working the helm, the capstan, the anchor gear, and for keeping the charts, signals and other instruments of navigation.
Each of the spaces deducted as above may be limited according to the requirements and customs of each country, but the deductions must never exceed in the aggregate 5 percent(2) of the gross tonnage.

( Art. 13 ) 

The measurement of these spaces is to be effected according to the rules set forth the measurement of covered and closed - in spaces on the upper deck, for result, obtained by deducting the total of such allowances from the gross tonnage, represents the net or register tonnage of sailing vessels.

  1. Extract from the final report of the International Tonnage Commission assembled at Constantinople in 1873.
    It is recommended that a penal provision shall be enacted to the effect that if any of the permanent spaces which have been deducted shall be employed either for the use of merchandise or passengers, or in any way profitably employed for earning freight, this spaces shall be added to the net tonnage, and nevermore be allowed as a deduction.
  2. Maximum raised to 10% from 1st April 1948.

Steam Ship 

( Art. 14 )

For vessels propelled by steam or any other mechanical power, deduct :

  1. The same spaces for sailing vessels ( Art. 12 ) with the limitation to five percent(1) of the gross tonnage.
  2. The spaces occupied by the engines, boilers, coal bunkers, shafttrunks of screw steamers, and the spaces between decks and in the covered and closed - in erections on the upper deck surrounding the funnels, and required for the introduction of air and light into the engine-rooms and for the proper working of the engines themselves.  Such deductions cannot exceed 50 percent of the gross tonnage.

( Art. 15 )

The measurement of the spaces allowed for both in sailing vessels and in steam ships
( section A of Art. 14 ) is to be effected according to rules set forth in Articles 12 and 13 for sailing vessels.

Art. 94 – Additional Deductions allowed by the Suez Canal Authority :

The SCA allows the following spaces to be included in the deductions specified in Art. 12
of the Regulations for Measurement of Tonnage, provided the deductions do not, in the aggregate,
exceed 5 %(1) of the gross tonnage and subject to the condition that they are clearly and permanently
marked so as to show the purpose to which they are exclusively appropriate :

  1.  Spaces for the exclusive use of officers, engineers and crew : 
    – Master’s accommodation.
    – Officer’s smoking room.
    – Chief engineer’s and Chief officer’s dayrooms and/or offices.
    – Doctor’s and dentist’s cabins ( if they are occupied by the doctors and dentists for whom they are intended ).
    – Consulting rooms.
    – Hospital.
    – Infirmary.
    – Surgery or operating room.
    – Chemist’s laboratory.
    – Cabins of wireless operators ( if utilized ).
    – Stewards cabins ( if the stewards are solely employed for the officers, engineers or crew ).
    – Cabins of the engineers storekeepers and water tenders.
    – Mess rooms. ( No deduction is allowed for officers mess room in vessels having passenger
       accommodation which are not also provided with a passengers mess room ).
    – Bath-rooms. ( With the exception of such bath-rooms as are available for passengers when no bath-rooms for their exclusive use is provided ). 
    – Lavatories.
    – Library.
    – Bar.
    – Gallery, cook-house.
    – Pantry.
    – Scullery.
    – Bakery ( only on vessels having no passenger accommodation ).
    – Laundry.
    – Drying room.
    – Heating boilers.
    – Refrigerating machinery ( excluding cold storage rooms and store rooms ).
    – Distilling apparatus.
    – Disinfecting apparatus.
    – Wardrobes, oilskin and life belt lockers.
    – Ventilators ( utilized neither for passengers nor cargo ).
    – Night watchmen accommodation ( provided these men are signed on as crew and are not employed in connection with passengers or cargo ).
    – Accommodation of fire fighting personnel(1).
    – Domestic water pump rooms.
    – Switchboard Lockers(2).
    – Transformer rooms(2).
  2.  Navigation spaces ( if above the uppermost deck ) :
    – Chart house.
    – Master’s spare room on the bridge ( especially on warships ).
    – Search light spaces.
    – Submarine telephone spaces.
    – Direction finder spaces.
    – Sounding spaces.
    – Gyro compass spaces.
    – Wireless telegraphy spaces.
    – “ Radar ” spaces ( exclusively used for navigational purposes ).
    – Lamp room ( if only containing signal lamps ).
    – Lookout houses.
    – Emergency compressors ( if used exclusively in case of accident for pumping out water and not for any commerical purposes ).
    – Switchboard lockers.
    – Transformer rooms.

Art. 95 – Measurement of Deck Spaces : 

For vessels fitted with superstructures, the following rules,
which concern only such spaces as are excluded from the national tonnage, are applied.

A – Vessels with one tier of superstructures only :

  1. Poop, bridge, forecastle :
    The following exemptions (1) are allowed under certain conditions :
    1.  Such length of the poop measured from the inside of the stern timber, at half height of the said poop, as shall be equal to 1/10th of the full length of the ship.
    2. The portion of the bridge in way of the light and air spaces of the engine and boiler spaces, is being understood that such light and air spaces are not considered to extend beyond the forward bulkhead of the stoke-hold and the after bulkhead of the main engine-room.
    3. Such length of the forecastle measured from the inside of the stern at half height of the said forecastle, as shall be equal to 1/8th of the full length of the ship.
    4. In each of the above three cases of superstructures, such portions as are in way of corresponding openings in the sides of the ship, not provided with any means of closing.
  2. Poop and bridge combined, or forecastle and bridge combined : 
    In each of these combined spaces, the following exemptions(1) are allowed under certain conditions :
    1. That length only which corresponds to the openings of the engine-room and boiler spaces as specified in (1b) above.
    2. Such portions as are in way of corresponding openings not provided with any means of closing in the sides of the ship.
  3. Shelter-decks :
    In the case of shelter-decks.  The following exemptions are allowed under certain conditions :
    1. The portions in way of corresponding openings in the side plating of the ship not provided with any means of closing.
    2. Such air spaces as are situated with in the shelter-decks must be measured into the engine-room space and deducted together with 75% of their volume.

(1) See ( Art. 96 – B p. 182 ).

B – Vessels having more than one tier of superstructures : 

  1. The exemptions Prescribed in paragraph A - (1),(2) and (3) above are applicable in their entirety to the lowest tier only.
  2. Tiers above the lowest tier, are only allowed the exemption(1) of such portions as are in way of corresponding openings in the side plating of the vessel not provided with any means of closing.

Art. 96 – Suez Canal Tonnage :

  1. The tonnage on which all dues and charges to be paid by vessels, as specified in these regulations, are assessed, is the net tonnage resulting from the system of measurement laid down by the International Commission held at Constantinople in 1873, and duly enetered, on the special certificates issued by the competent authorities in each country.
    In assessing the dues, any alteration of net tonnage subsequent to the delivery of the above mentioned certificates is taken into account. 
  2. In order that the exemptions from measurement shown on the special certificate may apply, there must be no merchandise, commercial stores, or supplies, of any kind in the portions of spaces which are entitled to exemption.
    1. Should a vessel, at anytime, transit with passengers, merchandise of any kind or bunker coal, or commercial stores of any description, in any portion whatever of any exempted or deducted spaces, the whole of that spaces is added to the net tonnage and can nevermore be exempted from measurement.      
    2. Nevertheless, the SCA agrees that in cases where the vessel is sold, the new owners can again claim exemption of the exemptable spaces previously taxed.
      The sale of the vessel must of course be effective and bona fide.  A new SC Special Tonnage Certificate must be obtained.

C – Double Bottom :

  1. When any bottom space is utilized over 6 inches for the carriage of bunker during the transit of the Canal, its cubical capacity will be added to the tonnage.
  2. Contrary, however, to the rules now in force, this addition will not be a permanent character, the cubical capacity of the said spaces will only be added to the tonnage when they are utilized.

D – Verification :

  1. The CA Officials(1) are empowered to ascertain whether cargo or passengers, are carried in any space not included in the net tonnage entered on the vessel’s special certificate.
  2. And, generally, may verify whether all spaces which ought to be included in the tonnage are entered on the certificate and are correctly determined thereon. Seamen occasionally taken on board vessels passing through the SC are considered as passengers, unless they are duly entered on the ship’s articles and certified as being intended for vessels belonging to the same owners.

E – Deck Loads :(2) 

Unfixed and unenclosed deck loads are not included in the measurement.
Closed deck loads on weather deck of cargo ships are to be included in the measurement.

F – Vessels without a valid special tonnage certificate :(3)

  1. Every vessel not provided with a valid special tonnage certificate showing the net tonnage prescribed by the Constantinople commission, to be measured by the CA Officials in conformity with the Rules laid down by the Constantinople commission.
  2. The net tonnage thus arrived at, is provisionally used for the assessment of dues, until such time as the vessel tenders at a subsequent transit, a special certificate duly drawn up by the competent authorities.

  3. If there are any difficulties in assessment of the net tonnage, especially in Maiden voyage, the dues shall be levied provisionally on the gross tonnage until measured in other trips.

G – Navy Ships :

  1. As long as the ship is not provided with SC Special Tonnage Certificate, transit dues will be levied on the temporary gross tonnage product of the empirical formula without any allowance till the presentation of documents required.  
  2. Navy ships may be on request to be escorted by one imposed tug or more during transit.
  3. Meanwhile, owing to special arrangements necessary for transit of navy ships, a surcharge of 25% of the transit dues is to be applied for Navy and auxiliary ships belonging to the Navy of different countries, also for ships chartered to Navy or ships carrying any military cargoes.

H – Vessels in ballast distinctive character :

  1. Merchant Vessels :
    1. Which are not carrying any cargo and does not earning freight on their voyage.
    2. Which are only carrying fuel for their own consumption.
    3. Carrying only its own crew, with their private provisions, are considered as being in ballast.
  2. Containers on containerships, trailers on vehicle carriers, and barges on lash vessels are considered as a permanent vessel’s equipment if fulfilling SC Conditions.
  3. The presence of oil residues(4) on tankers, as well as dry bulk cargo on bulk carriers or combined carriers, does not lose the vessels the privilege of being in ballast.
  4. A small quantity of the previous cargo(5) on the liquefied gas carriers, to maintain in a low temperature inside the cargo tanks to be able of receiving the new cargo, does not lose the vessel the privilege of being in ballast.
  5. Small quantity remainder of previous packed cargo garbage, sweeping, ... etc., not exceeding 2 Metric ton on general cargo vessels does not lose the vessel the privilege of being in ballast(6)
  6. For human reasons, the SCA will, however, tolerate the presence of shipwreck survivors rescued at sea on board vessels in ballast.  The presence on board of such survivors shall not render the vessel liable to dues at the full rate.
  7. A vessel landing her passengers or cargo before passing through the Canal and taking them on board afterwards will in no case be considered as being in ballast.
  8. Further, in order to be entitled to claim the benefit of the ballast rate, the volume of bunker coal or fuel must not exceed 125% of the engine room space as shown on the Suez Canal Certificate.  Bunker coal or fuel should, primarily, be contained in the vessel’s permenant or movable bunkers.
  9. On board vessels in ballast, the CA allows part of the bunkers to be carried in the exempted portion of the bridge without loss of the exemption.
  10. In any case, owners will have to take the necessary steps to ensure that the total volume of all bunkers on board can be easily ascertained.

(1) They are Authorized to get on board ships at Port Said, Bitter Lake and during transiting the Canal.
(2) For vessels carrying containers ( see Art. 97, 98 ).
(3) Document issued by the Tonnage Authorities of the vessel’s Registry.

(4) These residues must not exceed 1% of the vessel’s Deadweight.
(5) Not to exceed more than 2% of the Summer Deadweight.
(6) Rejected cargo not included.

Art. 97 – Regulations concerning the “ Containerships ” :

A – The Container Ships are closed spaces increasing the carriage capacity of the ship when situated over the main deck (weather deck ): 

  1. They are considered as a ship’s permanent equipment.  It is a matter of fact that those in the cargo holds are included in the underdeck tonnage.
    A surcharge on Canal dues relevant to number of tiers on weather deck is taxed.
  2. Containerships are to be exempted from extra dues on the top tier if it contains no more than ten containers (TEU).
  3. In case there is an upward protrusion of more than 4 ft, protrusion is to be calculated as an extra container.

B – Conditions to consider the containers as part of the ship’s permanent equipment : 

  1. They must belong to :
    1.  The ship’s owner.      
    2. or The time charterer.      
    3. or The container’s consortium.      
    4. or Containers leasing company.
  2. They must bear a serial number as well as the owner’s name.
  3. They must be registered on the ship’s official documents.
  4. The Master of the containerships must assure to SCA Representatives all facilities concerning
    the measurement and number of containers, their internal capacities and the kind of cargo contained.
  5.  Containerships are considered in ballast :
    If all container on the main deck as well as those inside the cargo holds are empty besides fulfilling all conditions mentioned above B - 1, 2, 3, 4.

Art. 98 – Regulations to be applied to vessels other than container ships carrying containers on weather deck :

  1. Any vessel carrying only containers is to be treated as F.C.C. ( fully celluler container vessel ) so far as the rate of SC tolls and the surcharge of the ratio of tiers on upper deck are concerned.
  2. In case of carrying container on deck beside their traditional cargo are to be treated like container ships carrying containers on deck so far as rates of extra dues for deck tiers are concerned, transit dues according to vessels type are applicable.

Art. 99 – Erroneous Declarations :

A – Dangerous cargo erroneous declarations :

  1. The SCA reserves the right to refuse access to Canal Water for any vessel in case of carrying prohibited cargoes, and in case of non or erroneous declaration on the presence of dangerous cargo or its state ( leakage or damaged container ) on board, such as ammunition, explosives, radioactive substance, etc.
  2. If the dangerous cargo mentioned in para. (1) is discovered during the transit, the SCA reserves the right to refuse access to Canal Waters to this vessel for a period not exceeding two years.  An additional due of ( 43 000 U.S. Dollars ) will be imposed for this violation.

B – Erroneous Declarations Affecting Transit Dues :

  1. If the CA Officials find out erroneous information concerning the cargo carried(1) or the ship’s situation : ballast or loaded resulting from the shipping clerk’s or the Master’s negligence, in all documents(2) held, the tolls difference will be doubled.
    The tolls difference means the difference between the correct and the wrong amount of the transit dues.
  2. Claims for errors in the declaration of tonnage or in the levying of the dues must be sent in within six months of the vessel’s passage through the Canal, starting from the next day of transit.
  3. In Case of submitting claims after period of six months necessary procedures of correction will be taken as from next transit whithout any retrofinancial settlement.

1) i. e. the carriage of sweet water as cargo while declared as ship’s water ballast; the omission of declaring the presence or quantity of containers on the weather deck or any cargo on board, passengers, etc.
(2) See Art. 15 p. 43.